Returning Research Results to Biobank Participants

July 12, 2017

The Partners Biobank has started returning research results to Biobank participants. These results are genetic variants, also called mutations, that indicate a high risk of developing certain conditions and diseases. The purpose of returning research results is to provide Biobank participants with information that could positively impact their clinical care. Results being returned are genetic variants that the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) defines as being actionable. This means that there are screening tests and/or preventative measures for people who have these variants.

Read the Biobank Newsletter (Spring/Summer 2017)

June 20, 2017

The Spring/Summer 2017 issue of the Partners Biobank newsletter for Biobank participants has been released.

New Approach to Disease Detection

June 19, 2017

The accurate detection of tissue damage holds the potential to transform medicine through earlier detection of disease, assessment of disease progression, and real time evaluation of treatment. Dr. Mostoslavsky of the Cancer Center at Massachusetts General Hospital and his lab are researching the connection between tissue damage and disease progression through the study of DNA. This new method has the potential to be applied to earlier detection of multiple types of cancer, type 1 diabetes, as well as the evaluation of tissue damage following a traumatic brain injury or stroke.

Read the Biobank Newsletter (Fall 2016)

November 21, 2016

The Fall 2016 issue of the Partners Biobank newsletter for Biobank participants has been released.

Using Genes to Predict Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk

September 6, 2016

Drs. I-Cheng Ho and Hui-Hsin Chang of Brigham and Women’s Hospital recently published a paper in Arthritis & Rheumatology on the results of a study they completed using samples from the Partners Biobank. This study investigated the relationship between a variation in a gene and the risk for the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Drs. Ho and Chang found that the variation in this gene leads to increased activity of immune cells, which can cause the inflammation characteristic of RA.

Dr. Kathiresan
Investigating a Gene’s Impact on Heart Disease

March 22, 2016

Dr. Kathiresan (pictured) and his team of investigators, led by Pradeep Natarajan, MD, and research coordinator Erina Kii in the Center for Human Genetic Research at Massachusetts General Hospital, are looking for a needle in a haystack.

Sekar Kathiresan, MD, uses the Partners Biobank to conduct research that would otherwise be impossible using traditional research methods.

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